Des Moines man Doug Jensen found guilty in capitol attacks

Doug Jensen, the Des Moines man seen at the front of the pack of rioters inside the United States Capitol on Jan. 6, 2021, was found guilty of all seven charges against him Friday in Washington.His trial started Monday. Closing arguments were held Friday. The jury received the case at 1:30 pm Eastern time to start deliberations, they read their verdict at roughly 5:40 pm Eastern. Jensen was found guilty of obstruction of a law enforcement officer during civil disorder, obstruction of an official proceeding, assault , resisting or impeding a police officer, unlawfully entering a restricted building with a weapon, disorderly conduct inside a restricted building with a weapon, disorderly conduct in the Capitol building, and parading, demonstrating or picketing in a capitol building. “Doug Jensen would not be stopped until he got what he came for on Jan. 6,” Assistant US Attorney Hava Mirell said in her closing arguments, adding that was to stop the peaceful transfer of power. “Doug Jensen was proud of himself on Jan. 6. There were heroes at the Capitol that day. Mr. Jensen was not one of them.”Prosecutors recapped Jensen’s movements and actions that day using a series of videos and photos. They say he was at the front of the mob, and nothing would stop him until the election certification was called off. Going count-by-count, prosecutors aimed to prove to the jury Jensen was guilty beyond a reasonable doubt. Throughout the trial, prosecutors called seven witnesses and showed extensive video from Capitol security camera video, other rioters, and Jensen’s cell phone, which he voluntarily gave to the FBI to retrieve evidence. Both sides rested Thursday, Jensen opted not to testify. In his closing statements, Jensen’s defense attorney Chris Davis told jurors to answer the “why” question. He said Jensen went to the Capitol to follow “the plan” of QAnon and “the storm” that day, referring to a series of arrests starting with then Vice President Mike Pence.”The pandemic did weird things to us…did weird things to everyone,” he said. “Apparently, Mr. Jensen was one of them.” Davis said Jensen was “confused,” adding that he thought he was at the White House. He said Jensen was the “closest thing to where’s waldo on Jan. 6,” referring to his black t-shirt with a “Q” on it, referencing QAnon. He added that Jensen was there on his own and was a “lone wolf” that day.”There’s just no other explanation of what he did that day. This was a terribly confused man,” Davis said to end his closing arguments. Jensen will be sentenced Dec. 16.

Doug Jensen, the Des Moines man seen at the front of the pack of rioters inside the United States Capitol on Jan. 6, 2021, was found guilty of all seven charges against him Friday in Washington.

His trial started Monday. Closing arguments were held Friday. The jury received the case at 1:30 pm Eastern time to start deliberations, they read their verdict at roughly 5:40 pm Eastern.

Jensen was found guilty of obstruction of a law enforcement officer during civil disorder, obstruction of an official proceeding, assaulting, resisting or impeding a police officer, unlawfully entering a restricted building with a weapon, disorderly conduct inside a restricted building with a weapon, disorderly conduct in the capitol building, and parading, demonstrating or picking in a capitol building.

“Doug Jensen would not be stopped until he got what he came for on Jan. 6,” Assistant US Attorney Hava Mirell said in her closing arguments, adding that was to stop the peaceful transfer of power. “Doug Jensen was proud of himself on Jan. 6. There were heroes at the Capitol that day. Mr. Jensen was not one of them.”

Prosecutors recapped Jensen’s movements and actions that day using a series of videos and photos. They say he was at the front of the mob, and nothing would stop him until the election certification was called off.

Going count-by-count, prosecutors aimed to prove to the jury Jensen was guilty beyond a reasonable doubt.

Throughout the trial, prosecutors called seven witnesses and showed extensive video from Capitol security camera video, other rioters, and Jensen’s cell phone, which he voluntarily gave to the FBI to retrieve evidence. Both sides stayed ThursdayJensen opted not to testify.

In his closing statements, Jensen’s defense attorney Chris Davis told jurors to answer the “why” question. He said Jensen went to the Capitol to follow “the plan” of QAnon and “the storm” that day, referring to a series of arrests starting with then Vice President Mike Pence.

“The pandemic did weird things to us…did weird things to everyone,” he said. “Apparently, Mr. Jensen was one of them.”

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Davis said Jensen was “confused,” adding that he thought he was at the White House. He said Jensen was the “closest thing to where’s waldo on Jan. 6,” referring to his black t-shirt with a “Q” on it, referencing QAnon. He added that Jensen was there on his own and was a “lone wolf” that day.

“There’s just no other explanation of what he did that day. This was a terribly confused man,” Davis said to end his closing arguments.

Jensen will be sentenced Dec. 16.

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